The Bible as Jewish Meditation Literature

The Bible is not fast food literature. If you find it hard to digest, maybe you should chew more slowly.

D. Thomas Lancaster

Bible

Bible Bible literacy meditation narrative study

The Bible is hard for modern readers to understand because it wasn’t written in the modern era. No one expects Shakespeare to read like a modern book. Neither should we expect the Bible to sound like it was written by J. K. Rowling.

In our culture today, we look for a fast-food approach to everything. We expect to get maximum results with a minimum of investment and effort. But no one masters anything that way. If you want to become a great tennis champion, you have to practice every day. If you want to earn a black belt in karate, it takes years of training and practice. If you want to train your Bible, you need to practice daily. Don’t expect it to happen all at once.

Fast food isn’t good for you anyway. Psalm 1 says that the ideal Bible reader is someone who meditates on the Bible day and night, chewing on it slowly. Every day. For now, just take four minutes and watch this quick video on understanding the Bible as Jewish meditation literature.

Episode four in our series, “How to Train Your Bible,” explores the unique literary style of the Bible that is meant to draw its readers into a lifelong journey of reading and meditation. The Bible is designed as a multi-layered work, offering new levels of insight as you re-read it and allow each part to help you understanding every other part. The Bible is the original meditation literature.

About the Author

D. Thomas Lancaster is Director of Education at First Fruits of Zion, the author of the Torah Club programs and several books and study programs. He is also the pastor of Beth Immanuel Sabbath Fellowship in Hudson, WI.

Bible

Bible Bible literacy meditation narrative study

Screenshot: YouTube

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